Ronald Volkmer

Ronald Volkmer
Professor of Law
Director of the Community Economic Development Clinic

While attending Creighton School of Law, Professor Volkmer was a member of Alpha Sigma Nu and the first Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review. He was a teaching fellow at the University of Illinois during the academic year 1968-69. He joined the Creighton faculty in 1969. While on sabbatical leave during the 1975-1976 academic year, he was a Cook graduate fellow at the University of Michigan. He has written articles for the Creighton Law Review and the Iowa Law Review. He is a member of the House of Delegates of the Nebraska State Bar Association and is an Academic Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. For the past ten years he has authored a column entitled “Recent Fiduciary Decisions” in Estate Planning Magazine. Professor Volkmer is on the board of directors of the Concord Center for Community Mediation.

Each spring semester Professor Volkmer takes groups of law students to the Dominican Republican for an international immersion experience.

  • B.A. (1966), J.D. (1968), Creighton University;
  • LL.M. (1973), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
     
  • Mediation Process
  • Property I
  • Property II
  • Trusts and Estates I
  • Trusts and Estates II

I am passionate about educating for justice and examining what it means to educate for justice in the context of a Catholic Jesuit law school. The former Superior General of the Society of Jesus, Fr. Kolvenbach, S.J., in his landmark Santa Clara speech in 2000 challenged all Jesuit educators to ‘educate the whole person of solidarity for the real world.’ According to Fr. Kolvenbach, this ‘solidarity’ is learned through ‘contact’ rather than through ‘concepts.’

Service to the community has always been important for me. Creighton faculty are in a unique position to offer their gifts and talents to the community and community service; and I have been fortunate to take an active leadership role in community, civic, and professional organizations. My activities outside the Creighton School of Law have included being the board chair of the Legal Aid Society, the Stephen Center, the Concord Mediation Center and the Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission.  In addition I have served my parish in various leadership roles.

I am most proud of the fact that at Creighton University School of Law I have been able to take Fr. Kolvenbach’s challenge seriously in providing law students with the opportunity to be ‘persons of solidarity.’ The week long immersion trips to the Dominican Republic which I have facilitated are based upon Fr. Kolvenbach’s admonition that ‘Personal involvement with innocent suffering, with the injustice others suffer, is the catalyst for solidarity which then gives rise to intellectual inquiry and moral reflection.

  • Transfers by Deed and Donative Transfers, in THOMPSON ON REAL PROPERTY (LexisNexis, 3d Thomas ed. 2011) (David A. Thomas ed.)
  • Nebraska Annotations to the Restatement of the Law of Trusts, SECOND (American Law Institute 1971)
  • The Uniform Power of Attorney Act: The Need to Update Nebraska Statutory Law, The Nebraska Lawyer, Sept. 2011, at 11
  • Nebraska’s “Total Return Trust” Statute: Unitrust Conversion and the Challenges of Managing a Trust and Drafting a Trust, 40 Creighton Law Review 135 (2006)
  • The Nebraska Uniform Trust Code: Nebraska Trust Law in Transition, 37 Creighton Law Review 61 (2003)
  • Update on the Proposed Nebraska Uniform Trust Code, The Nebraska Lawyer, Feb. 2003, at 26
  • A Spring Break With Substance 2, with Lawrence Raful, Creighton Lawyer Magazine, Summer 2003, at 18
  • Nebraska’s Updated Principal and Income Act: Apportioning, Allocating and Adjusting in the New Trust World, 35 Creighton Law Review 295 (2002)
  • Is There a Trust Code in Your Future? The Nebraska Lawyer, Oct. 2001, at 18
  • Institutionalizing Mediation: The Role of Lawyers and Bar Associations, 1 Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal 273 (2001)
  • Low-Income Housing and the Charitable Exemption, 34 Creighton Law Review 47 (2000)