Law Dean joins 156 Law Deans to Publish Rare Joint Statement on the 2020 Election and Events at the Capitol
Law Dean joins 156 Law Deans to Publish Rare Joint Statement on the 2020 Election and Events at the Capitol

american flagDean Fershee joined other Law School Dean’s to release a joint statement. Read the joint statement and see the full list of signatories.

Additionally, on January 6, Dean Joshua Fershee addressed the Creighton Law Community about the U.S. Capitol Riots. His statement is below:

What we have witnessed at the U.S. Capitol is heartbreaking, but it was unfortunately predictable. What some politicians seemed to think was political theater, was, in fact, real life with live ammunition. It makes me sad, and people are getting hurt. 

Our legal system is designed to give every single person a voice. Working for change and protesting things with which you disagree are consistent with freedom. Armed takeovers of government buildings to stop constitutional processes and change election outcomes are not. The response we have seen from our congressional leaders in both parties give me faith that we will work our way through this, but it is also clear we have a lot of work to do. 

As a legal community, we work to help people question processes and outcomes. We help them because, regardless of our views, that is consistent with freedom. Our profession requires, though, that we respect democracy and the rule of law. We commit to upholding our U.S. Constitution and our state constitutions. Taking long shot cases and working for the underdog is admirable when done in good faith. Such actions reinforce and protect freedom. But denying facts and wholly ignoring process, only when your team loses, is totalitarianism. And that should be, to every American, wholly and completely unacceptable.

I respect, value, and embrace the diversity of our Creighton Law community, and I mean “diversity” in every sense of the word. We come from different backgrounds and practice different religions (or do not). We are of different races, ethnicities, and identities, with different ideologies and political views. But we learn and work and grow together in an atmosphere of respect and with a common belief that were are in this together. We care about one another, and we work together for success. It’s something our nation needs to do, and I am hopeful that, as a community, will continue to help in that process. 

Wishing you safety and good health, 
Joshua P. Fershée, JD
Dean and Professor of Law